If you’re like many people, you overindulge where the holiday feasting is concerned.

This inevitably leads to New Year’s Resolutions surrounding fitness and weight loss, which usually last until about noon on January second.

If you’d like to break the cycle and turn your fitness New Year’s Resolutions into reality, here’s how:

Set Modest Goals

Don’t set a goal to “lose fifty pounds”  That’s a huge goal that’s not realistic.  Instead, set incremental goals:  Say, ten pounds, with a promise to set a new goal once you’ve achieved it.

Ten pounds is (relatively) easy, and once you achieve that goal, it will give you the confidence you need to achieve your next incremental goal.

Don’t Punish Yourself

Too often, people set a weight loss goal that sees them adopting a draconian diet of little more than twigs and berries.

It’s not surprising then, that about a week into the diet, your body rebels, your willpower crumbles and the next thing you know you’ve got a big spoonful of your favorite Ben and Jerry’s ice cream flavor in your mouth.

Where exercise is concerned, the same thing holds:  People start out trying to achieve the impossible, working out for an hour or two at a stretch, which leads to pain, which leads to frustration, which leads to giving up.

Slow and steady wins the race here.  Start with cutting out certain snack foods where diet is concerned, giving your body time to adjust and adapt.  On the exercise front, instead of trying a twenty-mile hike on day one, settle for a half mile down the road and back to your house, working up to the larger goals.

Don’t Weigh Yourself Every Day

Getting obsessive over what the scales say doesn’t help.  Avoid daily weighing.  Settle on a schedule of once a week.  You’re less likely to give up in frustration when you don’t see the needle move as much as you’d like it too.

Weight loss and fitness goals are achievable, but you’ve got to structure them properly.  If you do, you’ll be amazed at the progress you can make!

 

Used with permission from Article Aggregator